People of colour were more likely to be fined for lockdown raves, data reveals

People of colour were more likely to be fined for lockdown raves, data reveals

People of colour were disproportionately fined for illegal raves and other”amplified music” events during England’s and Wales’ Covid-19 lockdowns, the Guardian reports.

In reviewing data from National Police Chiefs’ Council obtained under freedom of information laws, that of 441 fines issued over”amplified music” events in England and Wales from March 2020 through July 2021, the report states that more than one-third of tickets went to Black, Asian or mixed race people, who make up less than 15% of the UK population. 60% of fines were issued to white people, who are more than 80% of the UK population.

This data adds to the increasing evidence that the UK police and government disproportionately targeted minority communities during pandemic lockdowns. A 2021 investigation by the Guardian and human rights organisation Liberty found that Black people were 54% more likely to be fined for breaching pandemic regulations.

Mixmag found in 2021 that former UK home secretary Priti Patel used false data on illegal raves to support the heightening of police powers during Covid lockdowns. Illegal raves (or anything that appeared to be one) during UK lockdown were frequent targets of undue police attention and large government fines.

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