A Day To Remember on new album ‘You’re Welcome’: “We didn’t make you wait for no fucking reason”

A Day To Remember on new album ‘You’re Welcome’: “We didn’t make you wait for no fucking reason”

Last summer, pop punk renegades A Day To Remember returned with the sunny day fury of ‘Rescue Me’, a collaboration with EDM superstar Marshmello. Marking their first new material in three years, it was a sharp left-turn from the gnarled post-hardcore stomp that carried them from angsty Floridian teens wanting to escape their hometown of Ocala, to the arena-bothering titans with the actual keys to the city.

However, it’s the anthemic pop rage of proper comeback singles ‘Degenerates’, ‘Resentment’ and last month’s ‘Mindreader’ that best showcase the real fire and compulsion that they promise from long-awaited seventh album ‘You’re Welcome’. With the world on lockdown and the record still not quite finished, frontman Jeremy McKinnon catches up with NME to tell us about defying expectations, and what’s been taking them so long.

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Hey Jeremy.  How are you finding life in lockdown?

“It’s tough, but we’re taking it one day at a time. We’re trying to figure out things to do for the fans but it’s hard. We’ve got webisodes that we filmed on tour last year and there’s some cool audio content that’s going to come with that, that people won’t really expect. It’s also frustrating not being able to get out and play these new songs because it’s such a crucial part of really getting it. Plus, we’ve never sounded better than when we’re playing this new material.”

Speaking of new material, ‘Rescue Me’ with Marshmello was a bold track to return with. Was that to prepare people for what was to come?

“‘Rescue Me’ was a way to get a heat-check from our fans. Will they accept this blend of ADTR and EDM? It’s been an overwhelming ‘yes’ so far. It was this cool way of getting them ready for what we’re going to try out on ‘You’re Welcome’. We take that sound and go super heavy, but we also go even poppier than ‘Rescue Me’. We run the whole gambit of what an ADTR record is. It’s just got this new, modern influence so it’s not the same record again.”

 

Have you redefined who ADTR as a band?

“It’s the first time in a long time that it has felt fresh. There are songs on this album that are mixes of things that I don’t know exist yet. It feels like ADTR, it feels like today and it also feels like a heavy band, all wrapped up in one. We branch out in directions we never have before, and it’s executed better than things we’ve done before. I just think they’re better songs.”

Does it still feel like a more positive record? 

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“We demoed like, 30 or 40 songs for this record and a vast majority were just different. I did say it was a happier record than usual but I was counting on a lot of the songs that didn’t get picked. It still isn’t this super dark, brooding record about some guy who is scared of whether his life choices work out, because my life choices did work out. I’m a father now, I’m happily married and I got a lot in my life I’m thankful for. A lot of those songs naturally showed that, but there’s still plenty on there that will feel familiar, so it’s about half and half.”

Are there songs that some people will hate?

“We always disappoint someone. Trust me, we do that every record. I’m not scared about it because I know it’s going to happen. We’ve definitely gone further on this album. If you’re looking to say we wrote a pop record, there’s absolutely some songs on there that give you the ammo to say that but there’s also some really kick ass heavy songs as well.”

With a more pop approach, do you want A Day To Remember to reach more people?

“Obviously that would be amazing. There’s nothing that would make me happier than if this record connects with both the fanbase and new people, because to do something that feels fresh but also feels like who we are has been so freeing. The core is still there, we’re just expanding into the future.”

A Day To Remember at Reading 2019. Credit: Jenn Five/NME

There aren’t many pop-punk or hardcore bands who could sub-headline Reading & Leeds like you guys did last year. Do you feel like you’re representing those scenes or proving that heavy music belongs on those big stages?

“That’d be awesome if that is the way people viewed it, but I’m just thankful. It’s always just exciting when the booking agent is like ‘We should be playing these rooms’ and it genuinely felt like a slow growth from when this first started happening for us. It’s a blessing to be in this position, this late into our career. There aren’t many bands that could go on tour with both Slipknot and Blink-182 and not get bottled. I think that’s pretty unique to us.”

Do you know when ‘You’re Welcome’ will be released yet?

“It’s still up in the air, everyone obviously wants it to come out as soon as possible but we’re going with the flow here. We’ve almost got all the masters in, I’m expecting them any time now. We’re still trying to get our artwork done. I know that’s been annoying fans but we have such a thing going. Every ADTR record has had these cool silhouettes that are unique to them and then, just because we were lazy and didn’t like people yelling at us, we just didn’t do it for ‘You’re Welcome’ yet. How lame is that?”







So you’re paying attention to every detail?

“It’s important for us to continue that legacy. It’s important that it’s up to standard. I do understand the frustration – it’s frustrating for all of us that the main thing holding up the release is artwork that for most people will be the size of a dime on your phone. But if we don’t put that time and care into it, is it really an A Day To Remember record? We’re going to do everything we can to get as much stuff out there for people. We didn’t make people wait for no fucking reason, so it better be right.”

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